English Language Editing Software

Editing is a crucial part of the writing process, but it’s one that many writers don’t like to do. Fortunately, there are now a number of editors that can help you with this task. One of these is Grammarly, an online proofreading tool that checks your text for spelling, grammar and punctuation errors. Learn more about English Language Editing Software with this guide.

In this post, we look into English Language Editing Software, professional proofreading software, proofreading and editing, and What is editing and proofreading process?

English Language Editing Software

Editing is a crucial part of the writing process, but it’s one that many writers don’t like to do. Fortunately, there are now a number of editors that can help you with this task.

Selecting the Right Software for You

It’s important to select the right editor, as each one has its own pros and cons. Some editors are better suited for users who need more editing options, while others may be more useful in situations where you want to create a document that looks exactly as it will look on print or online.

To help you find the best option for your needs, here are some tips:

  • Consider how much time you have available. If there’s a tight deadline on an upcoming project, it might be worthwhile investing in a more expensive program with more features than an editor that takes longer to learn how to use and costs less upfront (although any extra costs could mean fewer headaches later).
  • Think about what features are most important to you when creating documents. For example, if all of your documents use similar formatting schemes and styles—such as Times New Roman font with 12 points size—then you might not need advanced tools like automatic style detection or spell checkers built into the software itself; instead, these functions can easily be accessed via plugins such as Grammarly or Ginger Software.

What to Look for in an Editor

When choosing a language editing software, it’s important that you find one that meets your needs. Here are some things to look out for:

  • Reviews: Good reviews can help you know if the program has been working well for others and if it is worth the money. Reading multiple reviews will give you a better idea of whether or not an editor is right for you.
  • Reputation: An editor’s reputation should also be considered when making a decision about which one to use. A good reputation means that other people have used the software before and were happy with its results; therefore, they can provide feedback on what they liked/disliked about it as well as any problems that may have occurred while using it.
  • Easy Learning Curve: The learning curve refers to how easy or difficult it would be for someone who has never used this type of program before (ease). This depends largely on how intuitively designed each piece of software tends towards being; however there must also be sufficient documentation available online so users don’t get stuck at any point along their journey through learning new tasks associated with these programs’ functionality.”

Choosing the App You Need

Based on these factors, you can narrow down your search to a specific app. If you have a lot of time to dedicate to editing and are at an intermediate-level English speaker, Grammarly is worth considering. It’s free for most users and comes with free web browser extensions that will detect errors as you type. If you want something more advanced with more features and options, try Ginger or Hemingway Editor—both are available for $10/month or $100/year through monthly subscriptions (and both offer free trials).

For those looking for something cheaper, Wordy serves as a decent alternative ($4), though it lacks the advanced features found in some other language editing software. While there are many similar apps on the market that also claim to be able to help improve your written English skills, it’s best not to spend money on them until they’ve proven themselves worthy of your trust: many still lack sufficient reviews from users who’ve used them extensively enough to make any sort of informed decision about whether they’ll actually be useful (or if they’re just taking advantage of people like yourself who desperately need help).

Tools and Strategies You’ll Need

As you embark on your language learning journey, it’s important to have a toolbox of strategies and tools that help you do your best work.

In order to edit your own writing, you will need:

  • The ability to self-edit
  • Time management skills
  • An understanding of how long it takes you to make progress in a particular aspect of language learning (whether reading comprehension, speaking or writing).

Getting the Most Out of Your Editor

Getting the most out of your editor is as easy as saving your work regularly, taking breaks, and setting a timer to limit how much time you spend on the computer.

When working, save every few minutes (or even every few sentences) so that if something happens to your file or computer and you lose your work, you won’t lose too much. If things are going well, take regular 5-10 minute breaks—the longer you’re focused on a project without a break, the more likely it is that mistakes will happen later in the process because of fatigue or frustration. If any one action becomes difficult for whatever reason (typing gets slow due to RSI pain for example), take at least 30 seconds off from typing before continuing again with another action (such as scrolling through text).

Setting up an effective time management system for yourself can prevent overworking yourself unnecessarily by keeping track of how long tasks actually take so that they can be completed efficiently without losing any sleep hours due to exhaustion!

Once you’ve decided that you want to edit, there are many things you should consider when choosing an editor.

Once you’ve decided that you want to edit, there are many things you should consider when choosing an editor.

  • Make sure the editor has the features you need. Does it have spell check? What about grammar and style checking? What types of editing can it do?
  • Choose an editor that has a good reputation among other users. You may also want to read reviews for any editors you’re considering using. If people say that this software is great and easy to use, then chances are it will be good for you too!
  • Make sure the editor works on your platform—iTunes or Android devices, etcetera—and is compatible with any other programs or machines (like printers) that will be used during editing sessions as well as afterward if necessary; otherwise, things can get very frustrating very quickly!

professional proofreading software

Outgoing links in this post may be affiliate links in which this site receives a portion of sales (at no extra cost to you). Thank you for your support!

As part of my training to become a professional proofreader, I learned about the basic software proofreaders use. I also did additional research and found software that makes proofreading a lot easier and improves my job performance.

The majority of proofreaders do most of their work using Track Changes in Microsoft Word. Some proofreaders also choose to work with the Suggesting feature in Google Docs or use PDF markup tools in Adobe PDF editor. A proofreader may also choose to employ Grammarly or PerfectIt or both.

Let’s look at these software options to discover what they do and how much they cost. I’ll also let you know some of the pros and cons of the software products we’ll be discussing.

A Brief Look at the Best Software for Proofreaders

Basic Software for Proofreaders

A few basic software products are available for proofreaders. To make proofreading possible, you’ll have to use at least one of the following:

Microsoft Word is hands down the most popular software used by proofreaders. MS Word is a word processing software that has been around for over thirty-five years. Proofreaders make use of a feature in Word called Track Changes.

Track Changes allows you to proofread a document sent to you by a client.

In my time as a freelance proofreader, almost all the documents clients have sent to me have been Word documents.

However, now and then, I have a client who wants me to work with a Google Doc. A Google Doc is simply a document created in Google Docs. Google Docs is another word processing software that provides a feature for proofreading—the Suggesting feature.

The Suggesting feature in Google Docs is similar to Track Changes in Word.

Both Track Changes and the Suggesting feature are easy to learn and use. 

Finally, Adobe PDF offers a way to proofread a portable document format. The two versions of Adobe PDF editor are Adobe Acrobat Standard DC and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. 

This software is employed primarily by proofreaders working at publishing companies. I rarely have a client who sends me a PDF file to proofread.

A much cheaper alternative for proofreading a PDF is an app developed by Apple called iAnnotate.

Two Useful Software Additions for Proofreaders

Two other software solutions are worth mentioning here:

Although they’re by no means mandatory, many proofreaders use one or both of these tools while proofing a document. I run both on every text I proofread or copyedit for a client.

In reading through numerous reviews comparing various software products for proofreaders, Grammarly clearly came out as the number one choice.

The free version of Grammarly checks for critical spelling and grammar errors. It also helps with concision and has a feature that detects the tone of a document. 

Grammarly beat out Ginger (or Gingerly, as I just typed and quickly deleted, lol) in every review I read. These two software products are often compared since they have similar functionality.

PerfectIt is a tool that can’t be compared to the usual names in proofreading software. The reason it’s without comparison is that PerfectIt focuses primarily on consistency. Unlike other proofreading tools, PerfectIt will scan a text for consistency in the following:

PerfectIt also has a few other überhelpful features that we’ll talk about toward the end of this post.

Microsoft Word Is Wonderful

MS Word is the software of choice when proofing a document. As a proofreader who has worked on Fiverr, I noticed many proofreaders and copy editors who preferred having their clients send them Word documents.

I understand the reasons for their preference since Word is also my go-to word processor. Track Changes in Word is easy to learn and easy to use.

Luckily, since most clients prefer working in Word also, it’s by far the most commonly used software for proofreading.

Track Changes allows proofreaders to do the following:

These suggested changes (insertions, deletions, formatting changes, and comments) are easily viewed by the client. Red is the default color to display these suggested changes (edits).

Since I do almost all of my work in Microsoft Word, I want to share with you the colors I use for the suggested changes to make the edited copy even more visually appealing and straightforward for my clients.

I leave red as the default color to indicate the deletions I make. I show insertions in green, formatting changes in blue, and comments in black (black can’t be changed) with a yellow rectangle around them and yellow highlighting in the text to show which word, phrase, or sentence I’m referring to.

The client can then go through each suggested change and decide whether to accept or reject it with a single click.

Note: If you’d like to learn how to change the default colors in Track Changes, please see the video I’ve embedded below, and start it at minute 3:36.

I’ve only come across one downside to using Word. From time to time, clients aren’t aware of how to go about accepting/rejecting changes and deleting the comments.

However, this problem is easily solved by sending the client a YouTube video demonstrating how to work with Track Changes from their end. 

A free version of Microsoft Word is accessible online, but it has limited functionality. You’ll need the paid version of Word if you work as a proofreader. You can click here to see the current prices.

Word offers a one-month free trial for one of their subscription plans. Do make sure to cancel your free trial before it ends to avoid being charged in the future.

If you’re unsure how to use Track Changes in Word, the video below will teach you.

Going with Google Docs

The big difference between Google Docs and Microsoft Word is that a Google Doc is stored online in a place called Google Drive. You’re able to work on a Google Doc as long as you have access to the internet. A Word document, however, is stored on your computer (if you’ve purchased the software).

As I mentioned, the Suggesting feature in Google Docs functions like Track Changes in Microsoft Word; you can make insertions, deletions, formatting changes, and comments. It’s also easy to learn and use.

One of the pros of Google Docs is that clients can accept and reject changes and delete comments very easily.

The process is seamless as they simply click on a check mark to accept changes and click on an X to reject changes or delete comments after reading them.

Another advantage is that working with the Suggesting feature is free! Yippee for free, right?!

If you’re a proofreader who knows how to work with Google Docs, you’ll have the opportunity to be available to the handful of clients who use this software.

The only downside of Google Docs is that it isn’t compatible with PerfectIt. You by no means have to utilize PerfectIt if you’re a professional proofreader, but I’ve found that it saves me time and makes my job a lot easier.

When I get a Google Doc, I copy and paste it into a Word document and run PerfectIt. I then go back to the Google Doc and manually enter the edits I’ve accepted from PerfectIt. It takes a bit of time, but it’s not too much of a hassle if you’re working with a relatively short document.

If you’d like to learn how to use the Suggesting feature in Google Docs, please watch the brief video below.

Adjusting to Adobe PDF

The last of the basic software for proofreaders is Adobe PDF. Adobe PDF editor comes in two versions:

The PDF markup tools used in both versions are similar to the tools utilized in Word and Google Docs. However, the learning curve is a bit steeper.

Many publishing companies have their proofreaders work with PDF markup tools.

If you plan to work at a publishing house, it’s a good idea to inquire about the software they use.

As a freelancer, I seldomly come across clients with a PDF for me to proofread. If they do, I kindly refer them to a trustworthy colleague since I don’t work with PDFs.

The reasons I don’t work with PDFs are the following:

Note: If you’re not sure whether Adobe PDF editor is for you, they offer a seven-day free trial for Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. If you decide you’re not a fan, just make sure you cancel the free trial before the seven-day period ends to avoid being charged for the month.

All of that being said, if proofreading PDFs happens to be your thing, you have one other reliable option—it’s an app developed by Apple called iAnnotate. It’s not super intuitive to use, but it’s a much cheaper alternative to Adobe PDF editor. The last time I checked, it was a one-time purchase of $9.99 for the latest version—iAnnotate 4.

Please keep in mind that iAnnotate is only available for iPads and iPhones and must be purchased in the App Store.

Grammarly Is a Game Changer

When proofreading, I first run spell-check and PerfectIt to eliminate any spelling errors and consistency issues. Then, I proofread the document as I’ve been trained to do. Lastly, I run Grammarly as a final check.

Although Grammarly is far from perfect, it occasionally catches an error I’ve overlooked.

Although Grammarly is far from perfect, it’s an invaluable tool for proofreaders who strive to make a document as error-free as possible.

You’re probably much more familiar with Grammarly than with Ginger—a similar software. That’s because people have recognized Grammarly as the superior of the two.

For proofreading, Grammarly also comes out on top against ProWritingAid and Hemingway Editor.

ProWritingAid and Hemingway Editor are geared more toward helping writers improve their skills than assisting proofreaders with catching errors. They’re also useful for developmental editors and line editors who look at the bigger picture instead of focusing on the details of a text.

proofreading and editing

Outgoing links in this post may be affiliate links in which this site receives a portion of sales (at no extra cost to you). Thank you for your support!

As part of my training to become a professional proofreader, I learned about the basic software proofreaders use. I also did additional research and found software that makes proofreading a lot easier and improves my job performance.

The majority of proofreaders do most of their work using Track Changes in Microsoft Word. Some proofreaders also choose to work with the Suggesting feature in Google Docs or use PDF markup tools in Adobe PDF editor. A proofreader may also choose to employ Grammarly or PerfectIt or both.

Let’s look at these software options to discover what they do and how much they cost. I’ll also let you know some of the pros and cons of the software products we’ll be discussing.

A Brief Look at the Best Software for Proofreaders

Basic Software for Proofreaders

A few basic software products are available for proofreaders. To make proofreading possible, you’ll have to use at least one of the following:

Microsoft Word is hands down the most popular software used by proofreaders. MS Word is a word processing software that has been around for over thirty-five years. Proofreaders make use of a feature in Word called Track Changes.

Track Changes allows you to proofread a document sent to you by a client.

In my time as a freelance proofreader, almost all the documents clients have sent to me have been Word documents.

However, now and then, I have a client who wants me to work with a Google Doc. A Google Doc is simply a document created in Google Docs. Google Docs is another word processing software that provides a feature for proofreading—the Suggesting feature.

The Suggesting feature in Google Docs is similar to Track Changes in Word.

Both Track Changes and the Suggesting feature are easy to learn and use. 

Finally, Adobe PDF offers a way to proofread a portable document format. The two versions of Adobe PDF editor are Adobe Acrobat Standard DC and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. 

This software is employed primarily by proofreaders working at publishing companies. I rarely have a client who sends me a PDF file to proofread.

A much cheaper alternative for proofreading a PDF is an app developed by Apple called iAnnotate.

Two Useful Software Additions for Proofreaders

Two other software solutions are worth mentioning here:

Although they’re by no means mandatory, many proofreaders use one or both of these tools while proofing a document. I run both on every text I proofread or copyedit for a client.

In reading through numerous reviews comparing various software products for proofreaders, Grammarly clearly came out as the number one choice.

The free version of Grammarly checks for critical spelling and grammar errors. It also helps with concision and has a feature that detects the tone of a document. 

Grammarly beat out Ginger (or Gingerly, as I just typed and quickly deleted, lol) in every review I read. These two software products are often compared since they have similar functionality.

PerfectIt is a tool that can’t be compared to the usual names in proofreading software. The reason it’s without comparison is that PerfectIt focuses primarily on consistency. Unlike other proofreading tools, PerfectIt will scan a text for consistency in the following:

PerfectIt also has a few other überhelpful features that we’ll talk about toward the end of this post.

Microsoft Word Is Wonderful

MS Word is the software of choice when proofing a document. As a proofreader who has worked on Fiverr, I noticed many proofreaders and copy editors who preferred having their clients send them Word documents.

I understand the reasons for their preference since Word is also my go-to word processor. Track Changes in Word is easy to learn and easy to use.

Luckily, since most clients prefer working in Word also, it’s by far the most commonly used software for proofreading.

Track Changes allows proofreaders to do the following:

These suggested changes (insertions, deletions, formatting changes, and comments) are easily viewed by the client. Red is the default color to display these suggested changes (edits).

Since I do almost all of my work in Microsoft Word, I want to share with you the colors I use for the suggested changes to make the edited copy even more visually appealing and straightforward for my clients.

I leave red as the default color to indicate the deletions I make. I show insertions in green, formatting changes in blue, and comments in black (black can’t be changed) with a yellow rectangle around them and yellow highlighting in the text to show which word, phrase, or sentence I’m referring to.

The client can then go through each suggested change and decide whether to accept or reject it with a single click.

Note: If you’d like to learn how to change the default colors in Track Changes, please see the video I’ve embedded below, and start it at minute 3:36.

I’ve only come across one downside to using Word. From time to time, clients aren’t aware of how to go about accepting/rejecting changes and deleting the comments.

However, this problem is easily solved by sending the client a YouTube video demonstrating how to work with Track Changes from their end. 

A free version of Microsoft Word is accessible online, but it has limited functionality. You’ll need the paid version of Word if you work as a proofreader. You can click here to see the current prices.

Word offers a one-month free trial for one of their subscription plans. Do make sure to cancel your free trial before it ends to avoid being charged in the future.

If you’re unsure how to use Track Changes in Word, the video below will teach you.

Going with Google Docs

The big difference between Google Docs and Microsoft Word is that a Google Doc is stored online in a place called Google Drive. You’re able to work on a Google Doc as long as you have access to the internet. A Word document, however, is stored on your computer (if you’ve purchased the software).

As I mentioned, the Suggesting feature in Google Docs functions like Track Changes in Microsoft Word; you can make insertions, deletions, formatting changes, and comments. It’s also easy to learn and use.

One of the pros of Google Docs is that clients can accept and reject changes and delete comments very easily.

The process is seamless as they simply click on a check mark to accept changes and click on an X to reject changes or delete comments after reading them.

Another advantage is that working with the Suggesting feature is free! Yippee for free, right?!

If you’re a proofreader who knows how to work with Google Docs, you’ll have the opportunity to be available to the handful of clients who use this software.

The only downside of Google Docs is that it isn’t compatible with PerfectIt. You by no means have to utilize PerfectIt if you’re a professional proofreader, but I’ve found that it saves me time and makes my job a lot easier.

When I get a Google Doc, I copy and paste it into a Word document and run PerfectIt. I then go back to the Google Doc and manually enter the edits I’ve accepted from PerfectIt. It takes a bit of time, but it’s not too much of a hassle if you’re working with a relatively short document.

If you’d like to learn how to use the Suggesting feature in Google Docs, please watch the brief video below.

Adjusting to Adobe PDF

The last of the basic software for proofreaders is Adobe PDF. Adobe PDF editor comes in two versions:

The PDF markup tools used in both versions are similar to the tools utilized in Word and Google Docs. However, the learning curve is a bit steeper.

Many publishing companies have their proofreaders work with PDF markup tools.

If you plan to work at a publishing house, it’s a good idea to inquire about the software they use.

As a freelancer, I seldomly come across clients with a PDF for me to proofread. If they do, I kindly refer them to a trustworthy colleague since I don’t work with PDFs.

The reasons I don’t work with PDFs are the following:

Note: If you’re not sure whether Adobe PDF editor is for you, they offer a seven-day free trial for Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. If you decide you’re not a fan, just make sure you cancel the free trial before the seven-day period ends to avoid being charged for the month.

All of that being said, if proofreading PDFs happens to be your thing, you have one other reliable option—it’s an app developed by Apple called iAnnotate. It’s not super intuitive to use, but it’s a much cheaper alternative to Adobe PDF editor. The last time I checked, it was a one-time purchase of $9.99 for the latest version—iAnnotate 4.

Please keep in mind that iAnnotate is only available for iPads and iPhones and must be purchased in the App Store.

Grammarly Is a Game Changer

When proofreading, I first run spell-check and PerfectIt to eliminate any spelling errors and consistency issues. Then, I proofread the document as I’ve been trained to do. Lastly, I run Grammarly as a final check.

Although Grammarly is far from perfect, it occasionally catches an error I’ve overlooked.

Although Grammarly is far from perfect, it’s an invaluable tool for proofreaders who strive to make a document as error-free as possible.

You’re probably much more familiar with Grammarly than with Ginger—a similar software. That’s because people have recognized Grammarly as the superior of the two.

For proofreading, Grammarly also comes out on top against ProWritingAid and Hemingway Editor.

ProWritingAid and Hemingway Editor are geared more toward helping writers improve their skills than assisting proofreaders with catching errors. They’re also useful for developmental editors and line editors who look at the bigger picture instead of focusing on the details of a text.

What is editing and proofreading process?

I know it is frustrating to receive negative feedback on your manuscript. However, your supervisor is right about how the grammatical errors hurt your writing. Therefore, you need to improve your editing and proofreading skills. If this is not done, these errors can have a severe negative impact on your work.

Editing and Proofreading is Essential

Editing and proofreading are essential parts of the writing process. They help with the effectiveness of your writing style and the clarity of your ideas. Often, students and writers think that they are similar, but there are apparent differences between the two. Editing requires you reread your draft to check for more significant issues, including organization, paragraph structure, and content. However, when you proofread, you are focusing on finding and correcting errors in writing, grammar, and language. To begin with, you can inspect your supervisor’s comments. This will help you recognize what to look for as you start the process. You can also run grammar and language checks on your manuscript using a powerful writing assistant like Trinka. It is an AI-powered tool that performs advanced grammar checks, provides tone and style enhancements, corrects the inconsistency, redundancy in writing, spelling, punctuation errors, and more. As a result, you can improve the quality of your writing with Trinka and save a lot of editing time.

The Editing Process

Editing is a big task, but it is a skill that you need to learn. There are many aspects to developing this skill, but the points below offer an excellent place to start.

The Proofreading Process

After you edit your paper, proofreading it with a more focused eye will help you find errors and make the necessary revisions to improve the manuscript. Like editing, proofreading requires a systematic approach.

Other Areas to Focus On

As I have already told you, editing and proofreading helps you become an overall better writer. This will also help you with your use of language and writing style. For example, in a thesis, you want to make sure that you use a formal tone. Avoid using the passive voice, including phrases like “I feel” or “I think.”

One area that is also overlooked in a manuscript is the use of tables and figures to present your research findings. This is especially important in scientific writing because tables and figures are essential in giving the reader a chance to interpret and visualize data.

Tables

Tables are used for the reader to understand the data without referring to the text. You want to make sure that your tables include the following:

Figures

Figures present data in a visual format: photos, charts, graphs, diagrams, etc. They give the reader a chance to visualize information that might not be clear in the text. Like tables, figures need to identify the data they convey clearly.

I know this is a lot of information. Fortunately, there are a lot of resources that can help you with this process. For example, Enago offers resources to help you become a better writer and to learn about common grammar issues. For using tables and figures in academic writing. In addition, Enago offers Editing and proofreading services for the authors who find this task overwhelming.

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